Weaponized

Feb 04

[video]

Oct 31

[video]

Oct 27

Out of the Ashes | Filmmaker Magazine -

johnharrigan:

"The production (Strange Factories) fuses the haunting, authentic dreamworlds of David Lynch and the theatrical philosophies of Antonin Artaud, who believed in the Theater of Cruelty, using stagecraft to create a vivid and disturbing reality to powerfully draw in the audience."

Article and interview with Lucy and myself in the latest print and iPad issue of Filmmaker Magazine

Jun 11

: 'Strange Factories' will be unveiled at The Cinema Museum -

image



This Hallowe’en the doors open and the veil falls, allowing the mysterious and the magical to enter our world.



FoolishPeople is proud to announce their collaboration with The Cinema Museum London in the theatrical release of their haunted feature film Strange Factories.



A writer, possessed by a terrifying story journeys into unknown and dreamlike places, haunted by the infamous Hum emitted from a strange factory.



FoolishPeople and The Cinema Museum invite you to enter into the heart of English Dreaming and engage in a live cinema encounter like no other. Explore the world of Strange Factories and experience the madness and terror of haunted cinema, as you witness the film unravel inside Stronheim’s factory and its characters come to life around you.



The ghosts of the silver screen will join you in a mysterious ritual that will align you with the ancient paths of Die Geisteweige and immerse you in a film filled with magic, obsession and mystery.



Who is the infamous Stronheim? What exactly is the purpose of his hidden factory? And why have four performers fleeing from a burning theatre become enmeshed in the primal struggle of a story giving birth to itself?



Strange Factories draws on ancient theatrical traditions and mystical exploration, to wrench at the heart of what it means to be human.



Will you allow it to show you the wonder behind the moving pictures - the dreams of violent imagination?



Will you permit FoolishPeople to conjure for you, as darkness falls, and the lights go down?



Not everyone can survive the violence of Creation.



To celebrate the announcement, Director John Harrigan and Producer Tereza Kamenicka will be at the London Archive Film Festival tonight at 7:30pm to discuss the project.



26th October - 9th November 2013

The Cinema Museum

2 Dugard Way (off Renfrew Road)


London
SE11 4TH


Nearest tube: Elephant and Castle



Tickets £28.00 (£25 concessions)
Limited Edition Pack £35

Pre-order ‘Strange Factories’ today via VHX to be one of the first to witness its digital release on the eve of our first theatrical screening on October 26th.

Jun 09

vhxtv:

Direct Distribution is Important for Artists, Audiences, Everyone
There’s a lot of talk about new ways of watching, streaming, funding, and everything else-ing video.   
Which is why we’re so excited to be VHX right now, working in this intersection of video content and technology. Artists are generating an amazing amount of great content. While there are options for distributing free and ad-supported videos, there are not great options for actually selling your work. We are making a platform to get artists’ work seen, loved, and paid for.
Direct distribution is creators selling directly to their fans.
Instead of using other people’s stores and marketplaces, artists can sell from their own websites. This model points to the kind of close relationship between audience and creator that both parties want - axing the middleman idea that has come to define old structures. We are part of a new developing ecosystem of distribution, offering better, more flexible options to help anyone sell their work to the people who want it.
1. Because, Internet.
With the perpetual advance of bandwidth and plethora of devices to consume content, it’s just plain easy to watch online. We strongly believe that a digital copy of content can and should be superior to its physical ancestor. You can stuff your “digital DVD” with bonus content, subtitles, bundle with other goodies, or even change or release more content over time, free of old school restrictions like region-blocking. Miami Connection - a film that was barely available on VHS when it was made in 1987 - is now easy to watch anytime with hours of bonus content, anywhere in the world. 
Additionally, the Internet has enabled makers and their audiences to build real relationships, from #TeamCoco to Taylor Swift to Amanda Palmer. The webs of social networks that have developed over the last decade mean that artists are able to communicate en masse, for free, and connect to the fans that are interested in their work. Dave Grohl uses social media platforms as a way to tell fans about his doc, Sound City, connect them to upcoming concerts, and even answer personal questions. Content discovery is powered by people, and artists can have a direct connection to that process.
2. Direct distribution allows artists less restrictions, more control
Distributing directly to fans online relieves a lot of restrictions. Content does not need to fit into a specific package, like “feature-length film,” to be something that fans want to buy. House of Cards showrunner Beau Willimon explains that content like TV programming must adapt to the desires of a digital audience: 

“There’s not even a reason to stick the half hour or hour-long models. You can have an episode that’s 20 minutes, an episode that’s 90 minutes.”

A flexible platform allows artists to sell freeform content they may not have even considered.
Direct distribution also allows artists to command long-term control of the work they generate. They can be as creative with how they release content as they are with how they make it. Mike Birbiglia partnered with IFC to sell Sleepwalk With Me in the United States, but kept many of the international rights and sold his movie directly from his own site everywhere else in the world.
Keeping that control empowers artists to choose the distribution methods that work best. Technology offers precise information about audiences that you simply can’t get elsewhere. The filmmakers behind Stuck tracked their site referrals and focused their resources on what worked, while Indie Game: The Movie used audience and sales data to experiment with the optimal price point. Selling directly is a viable, accountable complement to everything else in the seller’s arsenal of tools, and what they learn from their web traffic can inform the rest of their distribution strategy.
3. And it’s better for fans anyway
Artists have the ability to make more money from their work when we connect them directly to fans. Think of it as the technology piece that’s been missing from their distribution toolbelt.
Every creator that we’ve worked with at VHX is so excited to be able to put their work online in a way that reaches individual fans in a personal way, and in a way that showcases the content: 

Minecraft: The Story of Mojang includes a bonus mini doc of the making-of their next big game. 


The Invisible Made Visible offers an extra Q&A with the man/myth/legend Ira Glass, plus a custom game for fans to play along with OK Go’s music. 


Doin’ It In the Park gave Kickstarter backers early access to the movie.


Dave Grohl includes a personal letter of thanks in each purchase email confirmation of Sound City.

And those are just a few. The freedom of selling directly empowers artists to be creative with their content and creative with how they show it to the world.
And that couldn’t be better news for us as fans. The nature and quality of video experiences keep evolving, and artists continue to explore ways for audiences to interact with their work online. As an audience, we get to keep supporting creators as they make things we want to watch - your wallet is a powerful way to vote.
We want to make direct distribution easy, so creators can reach fans, audiences can watch great content, and we can all support work we love without wondering where the money is going. 

The VHX platform is in action - check out some awesome artists distributing directly to fans. And drop us a line with distribution experiences you have, whether as an artist or content-consumer.

vhxtv:

Direct Distribution is Important for Artists, Audiences, Everyone

There’s a lot of talk about new ways of watching, streaming, funding, and everything else-ing video.   

Which is why we’re so excited to be VHX right now, working in this intersection of video content and technology. Artists are generating an amazing amount of great content. While there are options for distributing free and ad-supported videos, there are not great options for actually selling your work. We are making a platform to get artists’ work seen, loved, and paid for.

Direct distribution is creators selling directly to their fans.

Instead of using other people’s stores and marketplaces, artists can sell from their own websites. This model points to the kind of close relationship between audience and creator that both parties want - axing the middleman idea that has come to define old structures. We are part of a new developing ecosystem of distribution, offering better, more flexible options to help anyone sell their work to the people who want it.

1. Because, Internet.

With the perpetual advance of bandwidth and plethora of devices to consume content, it’s just plain easy to watch online. We strongly believe that a digital copy of content can and should be superior to its physical ancestor. You can stuff your “digital DVD” with bonus content, subtitles, bundle with other goodies, or even change or release more content over time, free of old school restrictions like region-blocking. Miami Connection - a film that was barely available on VHS when it was made in 1987 - is now easy to watch anytime with hours of bonus content, anywhere in the world.

Additionally, the Internet has enabled makers and their audiences to build real relationships, from #TeamCoco to Taylor Swift to Amanda Palmer. The webs of social networks that have developed over the last decade mean that artists are able to communicate en masse, for free, and connect to the fans that are interested in their work. Dave Grohl uses social media platforms as a way to tell fans about his doc, Sound City, connect them to upcoming concerts, and even answer personal questions. Content discovery is powered by people, and artists can have a direct connection to that process.

2. Direct distribution allows artists less restrictions, more control

Distributing directly to fans online relieves a lot of restrictions. Content does not need to fit into a specific package, like “feature-length film,” to be something that fans want to buy. House of Cards showrunner Beau Willimon explains that content like TV programming must adapt to the desires of a digital audience:

“There’s not even a reason to stick the half hour or hour-long models. You can have an episode that’s 20 minutes, an episode that’s 90 minutes.”

A flexible platform allows artists to sell freeform content they may not have even considered.

Direct distribution also allows artists to command long-term control of the work they generate. They can be as creative with how they release content as they are with how they make it. Mike Birbiglia partnered with IFC to sell Sleepwalk With Me in the United States, but kept many of the international rights and sold his movie directly from his own site everywhere else in the world.

Keeping that control empowers artists to choose the distribution methods that work best. Technology offers precise information about audiences that you simply can’t get elsewhere. The filmmakers behind Stuck tracked their site referrals and focused their resources on what worked, while Indie Game: The Movie used audience and sales data to experiment with the optimal price point. Selling directly is a viable, accountable complement to everything else in the seller’s arsenal of tools, and what they learn from their web traffic can inform the rest of their distribution strategy.

3. And it’s better for fans anyway

Artists have the ability to make more money from their work when we connect them directly to fans. Think of it as the technology piece that’s been missing from their distribution toolbelt.

Every creator that we’ve worked with at VHX is so excited to be able to put their work online in a way that reaches individual fans in a personal way, and in a way that showcases the content:

And those are just a few. The freedom of selling directly empowers artists to be creative with their content and creative with how they show it to the world.

And that couldn’t be better news for us as fans. The nature and quality of video experiences keep evolving, and artists continue to explore ways for audiences to interact with their work online. As an audience, we get to keep supporting creators as they make things we want to watch - your wallet is a powerful way to vote.

We want to make direct distribution easy, so creators can reach fans, audiences can watch great content, and we can all support work we love without wondering where the money is going.

Theme editor for Minecraft: The Story of Mojang

The VHX platform is in action - check out some awesome artists distributing directly to fans. And drop us a line with distribution experiences you have, whether as an artist or content-consumer.

(Source: e-m-p-t-y-s-e-t, via weaponizedextro)

: The Dream Must Be Free To Haunt... -

f00lishpe0ple:

image


Things are busy at FoolishPeople HQ - a great deal has been announced in the past week, so here’s a rundown for you because we’re well aware life gets busy:

The Theatrical Release of Strange Factories - Our first independent feature film

Interview with Strange Factories Director John Harrigan - New Intelligentsia Online Cinemas

strangefactories:

image

John Harrigan has been interviewed for New Intelligentsia Online Cinemas by Cynthia DuVal in early March, talking about Art, Strange Factories, Personal Transformation, F00lishPe0ple and our working practice ‘Theatre of Manifestation.

Read the interview here: John Harrigan on Art, Strange Factories and Personal Transformation

: The Weird & The Wonderful -

f00lishpe0ple:

image


FoolishPeople are weird.

We really are, and that’s not in some overly ironic hipster weird, because we like Marmite and peanut butter. Or because we’re an immersive theatre company that creates site specific productions, films and books. Or because we do it due to being driven, obsessed…

[video]

Mar 30

johnharrigan:

Upon ignition… SCHEMATIC - Quadrant - 3A - 7 http://www.facebook.com/strangefactories (Taken with instagram)

johnharrigan:

Upon ignition… SCHEMATIC - Quadrant - 3A - 7 http://www.facebook.com/strangefactories (Taken with instagram)

Mar 29

theatricarcana:

…on the lock indicated below to thy ‘noumenal engine’.
SCHEMATIC - QUADRANT 2C - 8

theatricarcana:

…on the lock indicated below to thy ‘noumenal engine’.

SCHEMATIC - QUADRANT 2C - 8

Mar 27

theatricarcana:

In wit and kindness…
SCHEMATIC - Quadrant 1C - 10

theatricarcana:

In wit and kindness…

SCHEMATIC - Quadrant 1C - 10

Mar 26

theatricarcana:

Do you begin to see the shape of things to come? 
Build and share your prophecy.
Once it’s whole again Stronheim will flick the switch and you will be rewarded.

theatricarcana:

Do you begin to see the shape of things to come? 

Build and share your prophecy.

Once it’s whole again Stronheim will flick the switch and you will be rewarded.

theatricarcana:

…bound to imaginari and may not be assigned or transferred to.. 
SCHEMATIC - Quadrant 3B - 12

theatricarcana:

…bound to imaginari and may not be assigned or transferred to.. 

SCHEMATIC - Quadrant 3B - 12